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Approaching The Victims of Anti-Youth Culture

November 20th, 2014

Approaching The Victims of Anti-Youth Culture

Juvenile delinquency refers to antisocial or criminal acts performed by juveniles. It is an important social issue because juveniles are capable of committing serious crimes, but most legal systems prescribe specific procedures and punishments for dealing with such crimes.
Approaches to the problem generally fall into two camps: the public health solution, and the law enforcement solution. Advocates of the public health approach tend to see juveniles today as victims of an anti-youth culture. The problem is not just parents failing children, but a whole attitude among adult society that is increasingly hostile toward youth.
A “delinquent” is defined as under the age of majority who has been convicted in juvenile court of something that would be classified as a crime in adult court.
It’s also not just poverty, per se, among children, but the relative deprivation of living in a society of affluence in which self-esteem is tied to achieving affluence. People are only hosts, not causes, of social problems, according to the public health model.
Most of the broken home literature, for example, shows only weak or trivial effects, like skipping school or home delinquency. Another area, the desistance literature, shows only that children from two-parent families age-out of crime earlier. In fact, there is more evidence supportive of the hypothesis that a stepparent in the home increases delinquency, or that abuse and neglect in families lead to a cycle of violence.
Mentally ill teens are often arrested, placed on probation, or held in juvenile correctional facilities. When a juvenile treatment center such as Elk River Treatment helps teens by using alternative methods, their problems with mental health disorders are sometimes more readily and more rapidly overcome.
Studies show more than half of juveniles in custody suffer from mental health problems. Nearly a third have attempted suicide and one in 13 take psychotropic medication, yet these troubled youths rarely get the treatment they need. Elk River Treatment can help.